Julius Caesar Essays

Julius Caesar Essays-54
Man's incessant need for control creates skewed understandings of 'justice and equality'.Brutus and Cassius never realized that their quest for a Caesar-less Rome would in fact destroy the heart and spirit of the Republic they cherished.Civilizations may rise and fall but man's desire to control does not change at all.

Man's incessant need for control creates skewed understandings of 'justice and equality'.Brutus and Cassius never realized that their quest for a Caesar-less Rome would in fact destroy the heart and spirit of the Republic they cherished.

With Caesar gone, the glorious Republic became unstable and fell, ironically at the ends of the men who attempted to save it.

Perhaps the most tragic flaw of mankind is its ability to build up glorious civilizations, and then tear them down when the results of their efforts do not satisfy the needs of a few.

It is a well-written piece and is logically organized.

The paragraph about Brutus falling into Cassius' trap is nicely argued, as it extensively uses quotes to show how Brutus' good intentions were his undoing.

He relishes the violent deeds he has done, and tells the other conspirators to "bathe our hands in Caesar's blood" (III. But Brutus does not wish to be classified as a lowly murderer, and thus starts to preach about the 'just cause' of the conspirators.

He even begins to use his beloved Rome as a scapegoat for murder, stating that he had committed violence not because he had "loved Caesar less", but that he "loved Rome more." (III. 22.) Brutus does not want the murder of Caesar to tarnish his honor, so instead he uses the 'state of the Republic' as an excuse.Brutus views Rome as an idea greater than himself, and Cassius uses this to his advantage when he thinks of how Brutus' "honorable mettle may be wrought from that it is disposed". Brutus falls into Cassius' trap, thus entering a conspiracy that will bring an end to the Roman Republic through violence.Brutus' ideas of justice are in fact instruments of corruption, a fact that he does not realize until the moment of his death. The conspirators do not see that the blood on their hands will eventually mark them as traitors.He tells the crowd during Caesar's eulogy that Brutus was "Caesar's angel" (III. 182.) amongst a crowd of antagonists, and therefore his treachery was the most significant.The plebeians are deeply moved by Antony's seemingly harmless speech, and Rome is plunged into a state of war and chaos as a mob tries to destroy the conspirators.Cassius fears that Caesar's rising power will further cripple the people, stating that a king would restrict the rights of noble citizens when they should always "be the masters of their fates" (I. Driven by jealousy, Cassius believes that the only way to save the Republic is to murder its greatest champion.Patriotic Brutus is soon convinced that Caesar must be eliminated, as he expresses that Caesar will be "scorning the base degrees from which he did ascend" (II. 26.), leaving the citizens as the Republic as mere pawns in a campaign of domination.According to Cassius and the conspirators, Caesar is dangerous because he wishes to be king, and that a Rome ruled by Caesar would be calamitous.To bolster his case, Cassius cites Caesar's history of infirmities to Brutus in order to portray Caesar as a cripple unfit to rule a country like Rome.The Roman Republic was the world's crown jewel until the selfish desires of men tarnished it with their foolish aspirations, turning the greatest civilization of ancient times into a victim of tragedy and corruption.The play reveals how man's utopian ideals are warped by selfish desires, wrecking any chance at perfection.

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