Frankenstein Mary Shelley Essays

Frankenstein Mary Shelley Essays-38
Within a few months, two films--Warhol's Frankenstein and Mel Brooks's Young Frankenstein--and the Hall-Landau and Isherwood-Bachardy television versions of the novel appeared to remind us of our blunted purpose.

Within a few months, two films--Warhol's Frankenstein and Mel Brooks's Young Frankenstein--and the Hall-Landau and Isherwood-Bachardy television versions of the novel appeared to remind us of our blunted purpose.

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In the Turkish society, her role would havebeen to fulfill positions of lesser rank, such as a daughter to her father or awoman in relation to the dominant men, and when in Europe, as a foreign Turk inrelation to native Europeans.

These relationships, however, were significantlyaffected by the teachings her Christian Arab mother instilled in her.

Hogle, "The Dream of Frankenstein: An Introduction" There are really two main "dreams" in Mary Shelley's original Frankenstein novel: Victor Frankenstein's daydream about the grand future effects of his creating artifical life and the nightmare into which he falls after he recoils from his finished creature in revulsion and exhaustion.

This second dream, quite complex, has become the subject of many interpretations, particularly in the twentieth century.

Forexample, when dealing with gender, it would be the relationship between Man and Woman and when dealing with nationality it would be the relationship between Native and Foreigner.

Thus, the character of Safie was defined in terms of herrelationship to those around her.Safie's affinity for the Christian religion is best shown in her revulsionat the prospect of returning to the Turkish land and her desire to marry a Christian and remain in Europe.In addition to the her unique religious point of view, Safie was alsoinfluenced by her Arabian culture but, however, Shelley does not go into muchdepth this aspect of Safie and stops at only a superficial, prejudiceddescription of the Turks.In fact, there are Eurocentric biases against the Turks throughout the portion of the book dealing with Safie.In order to examinewhy Mary Shelley included such biases in her work, one must first acknowledgethe distinct possibility that as she wrote Frankenstein, she carried with hersome prejudices of the Orient.The story of the book's origin is a famous one, first told in the introduction Mary Shelley wrote for the 1831 edition of the novel.The two Shelleys, Byron, Mary's stepsister Claire Clairmont, and John William Polidori (Byron's physician) spent a "wet, ungenial summer in the Swiss Alps." Byron suggested that "each write a ghost story." If one is to trust Mary Shelley's account (and James Rieger has shown the untrustworthiness of its chronology and particulars), only she and "poor Polidori" took the contest seriously.In desiring the European role and wishing to marry a Christian, she does not break the apparentconfines of her feminine role but the confines of her Arabian culture.Bybelieving in the qualities expressed by her mother, and by displaying them inher venture to violate her father's will to find Felix, she shows that hersubjectivity was not based on the opposition of women versus empowered men, asmight seem the norm, but was instead more distinctly based on the opposition ofreligiously submissive women in her culture versus the Christian woman, inspiredby the freedom she experienced before being seized by the Turks, that her motherwas.Because of the questions raised by these readings, as well as in Frankenstein's dream, these essays claim, we are thrown back on and must therefore confront the most basic ways in which Western self-representation has occured over the last several centuries.[go to Hogle's essay] Anne Williams, "'Mummy, possest': Sadism and Sensibility in Shelley's Frankenstein" Frankenstein's dream after "giving birth" suggests that the creature represents the unspeakable body of the mother within the Symbolic Order.

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