Essays On Frederick Douglass Learning To Read And Write

Women's Rights In addition to speaking out for the freedom of slaves, Douglass believed in the equal rights of all people.

He was outspoken in his support for women's right to vote.

He disguised himself as a sailor and carried papers that showed he was a free black seaman.

On September 3, 1838 he boarded a train to the north.

He also taught other slaves how to read, but this eventually got him into trouble.

He was moved to another farm where he was beaten by the slave owner in an effort to break his spirit.

Douglas and Anna settled down in New Bedford, Massachusetts.

Abolitionist In Massachusetts, Douglass met with people who were against slavery.

It was against the law at that time to teach slaves to read and when Mr.

Auld found out, he forbid his wife to continue teaching Douglass.

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